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Obesity and Diabetes in Pets

Gaining just a few extra pounds can cause big health problems for your pet. Although chubby pets may look cute, extra weight increases the risk that your pet will develop several preventable diseases and health conditions, including diabetes, arthritis and liver disease.

How Does Extra Weight Affect My Pet?

Obesity affects pets in many of the same ways it affects people. Weight gain increases pressure on the joints, which can lead to osteoarthritis and tears in the anterior cruciate ligament. If your dog already has hip dysplasia, piling on the pounds can worsen the problem. Overweight pets may quickly become tired when exercising and may become overheated more easily.

Extra weight can increase your pets' chances of developing heart failure, high blood pressure, liver or kidney disease, spinal disc problems and other conditions.

Rising pet obesity rates mean that a significant percentage of pets now face these serious health issues. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention estimates 54 percent of dogs and 59 percent of cats are obese or overweight.

How Common is Diabetes in Pets?

Diabetes is the third most common obesity-related condition in cats and the sixth most common in dogs, according to a 2015 Nationwide Insurance review of pet insurance claims. Although the disease can affect pets of any age, it's more common in older animals.

How Does Diabetes Affect Pets?

Every time your pet eats, carbohydrates and sugars in foods are converted into glucose. Glucose, a natural blood sugar, circulates through the bloodstream to provide energy to every part of your pet's body. The hormone insulin regulates how much glucose enters the bloodstream. If the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or your pet's body can't use it properly, his or her blood sugar level will begin to increase, causing diabetes symptoms.

If your dog or cat has diabetes, one or more of these signs or symptoms may occur:

How is Diabetes Treated in Pets?

In some cases, your pet can overcome diabetes with weight loss and a diet change. If weight loss doesn't help, or if the diabetes isn't caused by obesity, your pet may need to take oral medications or receive insulin injections every day.

Your pet's veterinarian may also recommend switching to a food formulated specifically for diabetic dogs or cats. You'll need to carefully monitor your pet's food and water intake and return to the veterinarian's office periodically for follow up visits and blood and urine tests.

How Can I Help My Pet Avoid Diabetes?

Diabetes can be prevented in many cases if you follow these tips:

Are you worried that your pet may be overweight or at higher risk for diabetes? Call us today to schedule an appointment.

Sources:

Association for Pet Obesity Prevention: Statistics

http://petobesityprevention.org/

Nationwide: Nationwide Data Reveals Pet Obesity on the Rise for Sixth Straight Year

https://press8.petinsurance.com/articles/2016/december/nationwide-data-reveals-pet-obesity-on-the-rise-for-sixth-straight-year

PetMD: Long-Term Effects of Obesity on Pets

http://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/evr_multi_long_term_effects_of_obesity_on_pets

AVMA: Diabetes in Pets

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Diabetes-in-Pets.aspx

Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine: Feline Diabetes

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/brochure_diabetes.cfm

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